Latest issue: April 20, 2017


Recently published

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory CNS demyelinating disease in which remyelination largely fails. Transmembrane TNF (tmTNF) and TNF receptor 2 are important for remyelination in experimental MS models, but it is unknown whether soluble TNF (solTNF), a major proinflammatory factor, is involved in regeneration processes. Here, we investigated the specific contribution of solTNF to demyelination and remyelination in the cuprizone model. Treatment with XPro1595, a selective inhibitor of solTNF that crosses the intact blood-brain barrier (BBB), in cuprizone-fed mice did not prevent toxin-induced oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, but it permitted profound early remyelination due to improved phagocytosis of myelin debris by CNS macrophages and prevented disease-associated decline in motor performance. The beneficial effects of XPro1595 were absent in TNF-deficient mice and replicated in tmTNF-knockin mice, showing that tmTNF is sufficient for the maintenance of myelin and neuroprotection. These findings demonstrate that solTNF inhibits remyelination and repair in a cuprizone demyelination model and suggest that local production of solTNF in the CNS might be one reason why remyelination fails in MS. These findings also suggest that disinhibition of remyelination by selective inhibitors of solTNF that cross the BBB might represent a promising approach for treatment in progressive MS.

Authors

Maria Karamita, Christopher Barnum, Wiebke Möbius, Malú G. Tansey, David E. Szymkowski, Hans Lassmann, Lesley Probert

×

Abstract

Perforin-2 is a highly conserved pore-forming protein encoded by macrophage expressed gene 1 (MPEG1). A number of studies have shown that Perforin-2–deficient mice are unable to survive following a bacterial challenge that is nonlethal in WT mice. There is also recent evidence that Mpeg1+/– heterozygous mice display an intermediate killing ability compared with Mpeg1 WT and Mpeg1–/– mice. Despite these in vivo findings, to date, no perforin-2 deficiencies have been associated with human disease. Here, we report four patients with persistent nontuberculous mycobacterial infection who had heterozygous MPEG1 mutations. In vitro, neutrophils, macrophages, and B cells from these patients were unable to kill Mycobacterium avium as efficiently as normal controls. CRISPR mutagenesis validated the deleterious antibacterial activity of these mutations. These data suggest that perforin-2 haploinsufficiency may contribute to human susceptibility to infections with intracellular bacteria.

Authors

Ryan M. McCormack, Eva P. Szymanski, Amy P. Hsu, Elena Perez, Kenneth N. Olivier, Eva Fisher, E. Brook Goodhew, Eckhard R. Podack, Steven M. Holland

×

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), characterized by an excess accumulation of hepatic triglycerides, is a growing health epidemic. While ER stress in the liver has been implicated in the development of NAFLD, the role of brain ER stress — which is emerging as a key contributor to a number of chronic diseases including obesity — in NAFLD remains unclear. These studies reveal that chemical induction of ER stress in the brain caused hepatomegaly and hepatic steatosis in mice. Conversely, pharmacological reductions in brain ER stress in diet-induced obese mice rescued NAFLD independent of body weight, food intake, and adiposity. Evaluation of brain regions involved revealed robust activation of ER stress biomarkers and ER ultrastructural abnormalities in the circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO), a nucleus situated outside of the blood-brain-barrier, in response to high-fat diet. Targeted reductions in SFO-ER stress in obese mice via SFO-specific supplementation of the ER chaperone 78-kDa glucose–regulated protein ameliorated hepatomegaly and hepatic steatosis without altering body weight, food intake, adiposity, or obesity-induced hypertension. Overall, these findings indicate a novel role for brain ER stress, notably within the SFO, in the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

Authors

Julie A. Horwath, Chansol Hurr, Scott D. Butler, Mallikarjun Guruju, Martin D. Cassell, Allyn L. Mark, Robin L. Davisson, Colin N. Young

×

Abstract

Secreted modular calcium-binding protein 2 (SMOC2) belongs to the secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) family of matricellular proteins whose members are known to modulate cell-matrix interactions. We report that SMOC2 is upregulated in the kidney tubular epithelial cells of mice and humans following fibrosis. Using genetically manipulated mice with SMOC2 overexpression or knockdown, we show that SMOC2 is critically involved in the progression of kidney fibrosis. Mechanistically, we found that SMOC2 activates a fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition (FMT) to stimulate stress fiber formation, proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix production. Furthermore, we demonstrate that targeting SMOC2 by siRNA results in attenuation of TGFβ1-mediated FMT in vitro and an amelioration of kidney fibrosis in mice. These findings implicate that SMOC2 is a key signaling molecule in the pathological secretome of a damaged kidney and targeting SMOC2 offers a therapeutic strategy for inhibiting FMT-mediated kidney fibrosis — an unmet medical need.

Authors

Casimiro Gerarduzzi, Ramya K. Kumar, Priyanka Trivedi, Amrendra K. Ajay, Ashwin Iyer, Sarah Boswell, John N. Hutchinson, Sushrut S. Waikar, Vishal S. Vaidya

×

Abstract

BACKGROUND. The combination of multikinase VEGF inhibitor regorafenib and anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab overcomes intrinsic and acquired resistance in both EGFR-sensitive and EGFR-resistant preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC).

METHODS. Utilizing a standard 3+3 design, a phase I study was designed to determine safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of the regorafenib plus cetuximab combination among patients with advanced cancer including CRC. Comprehensive genomic profiling was performed on the exceptional responder.

RESULTS. Among the 27 patients enrolled the median age was 54 years. None of 19 patients treated at dose level 1 (cetuximab i.v. 200 mg/m2 followed by 150 mg/m2 weekly + regorafenib 80 mg daily) experienced a DLT, and 2 of 5 patients treated at dose level 2 (cetuximab i.v. 200 mg/m2 followed by 150 mg/m2 weekly + regorafenib 120 mg daily) experienced a DLT (grade 3 thrombocytopenia [n = 1] and grade 3 intra-abdominal bleed [n = 1]). Most common adverse events were grade 1 or 2 rash (20 patients). Of 24 evaluable patients, 11 (46%) patients had clinical benefit (stable disease > 6 cycles or partial response [PR]) (CRC n = 8, one patient each with head and neck cancer, carcinoma of unknown primary, and glioblastoma). A CRC patient, who progressed on anti-EGFR and regorafenib, achieved a PR (46% decrease per RECIST v1.1) lasting 15 months. Genomic profiling of an exceptional responder with response for over 27 cycles revealed hypermutated genotype with microsatellite instability (MSI).

CONCLUSION. Regorafenib 80 mg daily plus cetuximab 200 mg/m2 loading dose, followed by 150 mg/m2 every week is the MTD/recommended phase II dose. The combination demonstrated early signals of activity in wild-type CRC, including 1 exceptional responder with MSI high.

TRIAL REGISTRATION. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02095054

FUNDING. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is supported by the NIH Cancer Center Support Grant CA016672. This work was supported in part by the Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas grant RP110584 and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences grant UL1 TR000371 (Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences).

Authors

Vivek Subbiah, Muhammad Rizwan Khawaja, David S. Hong, Behrang Amini, Jiang Yungfang, Hui Liu, Adrienne Johnson, Alexa B. Schrock, Siraj M. Ali, James X. Sun, David Fabrizio, Sarina Piha-Paul, Siqing Fu, Apostolia M. Tsimberidou, Aung Naing, Filip Janku, Daniel D. Karp, Michael Overman, Cathy Eng, Scott Kopetz, Funda Meric-Bernstam, Gerald S. Falchook

×

Abstract

ICOS costimulation generates Th17 cells with durable memory responses to tumor. Herein, we found that ICOS induces PI3K/p110δ/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in Th17 cells. Coinhibiting PI3Kδ and β-catenin altered the biological fate of Th17 cells. Th17 cells inhibited of both pathways expressed less RORγt, which, in turn, reduced their ability to secrete IL-17. Unexpectedly, these cells were more effective (than uninhibited cells) at regressing tumor when infused into mice, leading to long-term curative responses. PI3Kδ inhibition expanded precursor Th17 cells with a central memory phenotype that expressed nominal regulatory properties (low FoxP3), while β-catenin inhibition enhanced Th17 multifunctionality in vivo. Remarkably, upon TCR restimulation, RORγt and IL-17 rebounded in Th17 cells treated with PI3Kδ and β-catenin inhibitors. Moreover, these cells regained β-catenin, Tcf7, and Akt expression, licensing them to secrete heightened IL-2, persist, and eradicate solid tumors without help from endogenous NK and CD8 T cells. This finding shines a light on ways to repurpose FDA-approved drugs to augment T cell–based cancer immunotherapies.

Authors

Kinga Majchrzak, Michelle H. Nelson, Jacob S. Bowers, Stefanie R. Bailey, Megan M. Wyatt, John M. Wrangle, Mark P. Rubinstein, Juan C. Varela, Zihai Li, Richard A. Himes, Sherine S.L. Chan, Chrystal M. Paulos

×

Abstract

G protein–coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) was recently highlighted as a colon-homing receptor for murine and human CD4+ T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the functional phenotype of human GPR15+CD4+ T cells, focusing on Tregs and effector T cells (Teffs), and to determine whether GPR15 is the driver for the migration of T cells to the colon during ulcerative colitis (UC). In the peripheral blood, GPR15 was expressed on Tregs and Teffs; both GPR15+ T cell subsets produced less IFN-γ and IL-4 but more IL-17 after stimulation and showed a higher migration activity compared with GPR15CD4+ T cells. In UC patients, GPR15 expression was increased on Tregs in the peripheral blood but not on Teffs. Interestingly, the expression of GPR15 was significantly enhanced on colonic T cells of UC patients in noninflamed biopsies but not in inflamed biopsies. The differential expression of GPR15 in UC patients was accompanied by a significant reduction of bacterial immunoregulatory metabolites in the feces. In conclusion, GPR15 expression on CD4+ T cells is altered in UC patients, which may have implications for the development of therapeutic approaches to target T cell trafficking to the colon.

Authors

Alexandra Adamczyk, Daniel Gageik, Annika Frede, Eva Pastille, Wiebke Hansen, Andreas Rueffer, Jan Buer, Jürgen Büning, Jost Langhorst, Astrid M. Westendorf

×

Abstract

Background. Reports on long-term (≥10 years) effects of cancer vaccines are missing. Therefore, in 2002, we initiated a phase I/II trial in cutaneous melanoma patients to further explore the immunogenicity of our DC vaccine and to establish its long-term toxicity and clinical benefit after a planned 10-year followup.

Methods. Monocyte-derived DCs matured by TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and PGE2 and then loaded with 4 HLA class I and 6 class II–restricted tumor peptides were injected intradermally in high doses over 2 years. We performed serial immunomonitoring in all 53 evaluable patients.

Results. Vaccine-specific immune responses including high-affinity, IFNγ-producing CD4+ and lytic polyfunctional CD8+ T cells were de novo induced or boosted in most patients. Exposure of mature DCs to trimeric soluble CD40 ligand, unexpectedly, did not further enhance such immune responses, while keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) pulsing to provide unspecific CD4+ help promoted CD8+ T cell responses — notably, their longevity. An unexpected 19% of nonresectable metastatic melanoma patients are still alive after 11 years, a survival rate similar to that observed in ipilimumab-treated patients and achieved without any major (>grade 2) toxicity. Survival correlated significantly with the development of intense vaccine injection site reactions, and with blood eosinophilia after the first series of vaccinations, suggesting that prolonged survival was a consequence of DC vaccination.

Conclusions. Long-term survival in advanced melanoma patients undergoing DC vaccination is similar to ipilimumab-treated patients and occurs upon induction of tumor-specific T cells, blood eosinophilia, and strong vaccine injection site reactions occurring after the initial vaccinations.

TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00053391.

FUNDING. European Community, Sixth Framework Programme (Cancerimmunotherapy LSHC-CT-2006-518234; DC-THERA LSHB-CT-2004-512074), and German Research Foundation (CRC 643, C1, Z2).

Authors

Stefanie Gross, Michael Erdmann, Ina Haendle, Steve Voland, Thomas Berger, Erwin Schultz, Erwin Strasser, Peter Dankerl, Rolf Janka, Stefan Schliep, Lucie Heinzerling, Karl Sotlar, Pierre Coulie, Gerold Schuler, Beatrice Schuler-Thurner

×

Abstract

β-Klotho (encoded by Klb) is the obligate coreceptor mediating FGF21 and FGF15/19 signaling. Klb–/– mice are refractory to beneficial action of pharmacological FGF21 treatment including stimulation of glucose utilization and thermogenesis. Here, we investigated the energy homeostasis in Klb–/– mice on high-fat diet in order to better understand the consequences of abrogating both endogenous FGF15/19 and FGF21 signaling during caloric overload. Surprisingly, Klb–/– mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity (DIO) owing to enhanced energy expenditure and BAT activity. Klb–/– mice exhibited not only an increase but also a shift in bile acid (BA) composition featured by activation of the classical (neutral) BA synthesis pathway at the expense of the alternative (acidic) pathway. High hepatic production of cholic acid (CA) results in a large excess of microbiota-derived deoxycholic acid (DCA). DCA is specifically responsible for activating the TGR5 receptor that stimulates BAT thermogenic activity. In fact, combined gene deletion of Klb and Tgr5 or antibiotic treatment abrogating bacterial conversion of CA into DCA both abolish DIO resistance in Klb–/– mice. These results suggested that DIO resistance in Klb–/– mice is caused by high levels of DCA, signaling through the TGR5 receptor. These data also demonstrated that gut microbiota can regulate host thermogenesis via conversion of primary into secondary BA. Pharmacologic or nutritional approaches to selectively modulate BA composition may be a promising target for treating metabolic disorders.

Authors

Emmanuel Somm, Hugues Henry, Stephen J. Bruce, Sébastien Aeby, Marta Rosikiewicz, Gerasimos P. Sykiotis, Mohammed Asrih, François R. Jornayvaz, Pierre Damien Denechaud, Urs Albrecht, Moosa Mohammadi, Andrew Dwyer, James S. Acierno Jr., Kristina Schoonjans, Lluis Fajas, Gilbert Greub, Nelly Pitteloud

×

Abstract

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a lethal genetic arrhythmia that manifests syncope or sudden death in children and young adults under stress conditions. CPVT patients often present bradycardia and sino-atrial node (SAN) dysfunction. However, the mechanism remains unclear. We analyzed SAN function in two CPVT families and in a novel knock-in (KI) mouse model carrying the RyR2R420Q mutation. Humans and KI mice presented slower resting heart rate. Accordingly, the rate of spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) transients was slower in KI mouse SAN preparations than in WT, without any significant alteration in the “funny” current (If ). The L-type Ca2+ current was reduced in KI SAN cells in a [Ca2+]i-dependent way, suggesting that bradycardia was due to disrupted crosstalk between the “voltage” and “Ca2+” clock, and the mechanisms of pacemaking was induced by aberrant spontaneous RyR2- dependent Ca2+ release. This finding was consistent with a higher Ca2+ leak during diastolic periods produced by long-lasting Ca2+ sparks in KI SAN cells. Our results uncover a mechanism for the CPVT-causing RyR2 N-terminal mutation R420Q, and they highlight the fact that enhancing the Ca2+ clock may slow the heart rhythm by disturbing the coupling between Ca2+ and voltage clocks.

Authors

Yue Yi Wang, Pietro Mesirca, Elena Marqués-Sulé, Alexandra Zahradnikova Jr., Olivier Villejoubert, Pilar D’Ocon, Cristina Ruiz, Diana Domingo, Esther Zorio, Matteo E. Mangoni, Jean-Pierre Benitah, Ana María Gómez

×

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a life-threatening disease without effective treatment, highlighting the need for identifying new targets and treatment modalities. The pathogenesis of IPF is complex, and engaging multiple targets simultaneously might improve therapeutic efficacy. To assess the role of the endocannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor 1 (endocannabinoid/CB1R) system in IPF and its interaction with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as dual therapeutic targets, we analyzed lung fibrosis and the status of the endocannabinoid/CB1R system and iNOS in mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with IPF, as well as controls. In addition, we investigated the antifibrotic efficacy in the mouse PF model of an orally bioavailable and peripherally restricted CB1R/iNOS hybrid inhibitor. We report that increased activity of the endocannabinoid/CB1R system parallels disease progression in the lungs of patients with idiopathic PF and in mice with bleomycin-induced PF and is associated with increased tissue levels of interferon regulatory factor-5. Furthermore, we demonstrate that simultaneous engagement of the secondary target iNOS by the hybrid CB1R/iNOS inhibitor has greater antifibrotic efficacy than inhibition of CB1R alone. This hybrid antagonist also arrests the progression of established fibrosis in mice, thus making it a viable candidate for future translational studies in IPF.

Authors

Resat Cinar, Bernadette R. Gochuico, Malliga R. Iyer, Tony Jourdan, Tadafumi Yokoyama, Joshua K. Park, Nathan J. Coffey, Hadass Pri-Chen, Gergő Szanda, Ziyi Liu, Ken Mackie, William A. Gahl, George Kunos

×

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) infections have been linked with neurological complications and congenital Zika syndrome. Given the high level of homology between ZIKV and the related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV), we investigated the level of cross-reactivity with ZIKV using a panel of DENV human mAbs. A majority of the mAbs showed binding to ZIKV virions, with several exhibiting neutralizing capacities against ZIKV in vitro. Three of the best ZIKV-neutralizing mAbs were found to recognize diverse epitopes on the envelope (E) glycoprotein: the highly conserved fusion-loop peptide, a conformation-specific epitope on the E monomer, and a quaternary epitope on the virion surface. The most potent ZIKV-neutralizing mAb (SIgN-3C) was assessed in 2 type I interferon receptor–deficient (IFNAR–/–) mouse models of ZIKV infection. Treatment of adult nonpregnant mice with SIgN-3C rescued mice from virus-induced weight loss and mortality. The SIgN-3C variant with Leu-to-Ala mutations in the Fc region (SIgN-3C-LALA) did not induce antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) in vitro but provided similar levels of protection in vivo. In pregnant ZIKV-infected IFNAR–/– mice, treatment with SIgN-3C or SIgN-3C-LALA significantly reduced viral load in the fetal organs and placenta and abrogated virus-induced fetal growth retardation. Therefore, SIgN-3C-LALA holds promise as a ZIKV prophylactic and therapeutic agent.

Authors

Yiu-Wing Kam, Cheryl Yi-Pin Lee, Teck-Hui Teo, Shanshan W. Howland, Siti Naqiah Amrun, Fok-Moon Lum, Peter See, Nicholas Qing-Rong Kng, Roland G. Huber, Mei-Hui Xu, Heng-Liang Tan, Andre Choo, Sebastian Maurer-Stroh, Florent Ginhoux, Katja Fink, Cheng-I Wang, Lisa F.P. Ng, Laurent Rénia

×

Abstract

We lack a mechanistic explanation for the stereotyped pattern of white matter loss seen in Huntington’s disease (HD). While the earliest white matter changes are seen around the striatum, within the corpus callosum, and in the posterior white matter tracts, the order in which these changes occur and why these white matter connections are specifically vulnerable is unclear. Here, we use diffusion tractography in a longitudinal cohort of individuals yet to develop clinical symptoms of HD to identify a hierarchy of vulnerability, where the topological length of white matter connections between a brain area and its neighbors predicts the rate of atrophy over 24 months. This demonstrates a new principle underlying neurodegeneration in HD, whereby brain connections with the greatest topological length are the first to suffer damage that can account for the stereotyped pattern of white matter loss observed in premanifest HD.

Authors

Peter McColgan, Kiran K. Seunarine, Sarah Gregory, Adeel Razi, Marina Papoutsi, Jeffrey D. Long, James A. Mills, Eileanoir Johnson, Alexandra Durr, Raymund A.C. Roos, Blair R. Leavitt, Julie C. Stout, Rachael I. Scahill, Chris A. Clark, Geraint Rees, Sarah J. Tabrizi, the Track-On HD Investigators

×

Abstract

Humoral immunity is critical for viral control, but the identity and mechanisms regulating human antiviral B cells are unclear. Here, we characterized human B cells expressing T-bet and analyzed their dynamics during viral infections. T-bet+ B cells demonstrated an activated phenotype, a distinct transcriptional profile, and were enriched for expression of the antiviral immunoglobulin isotypes IgG1 and IgG3. T-bet+ B cells expanded following yellow fever virus and vaccinia virus vaccinations and also during early acute HIV infection. Viremic HIV-infected individuals maintained a large T-bet+ B cell population during chronic infection that was associated with increased serum and cell-associated IgG1 and IgG3 expression. The HIV gp140–specific B cell response was dominated by T-bet–expressing memory B cells, and we observed a concomitant biasing of gp140-specific serum immunoglobulin to the IgG1 isotype. These findings suggest that T-bet induction promotes antiviral immunoglobulin isotype switching and development of a distinct T-bet+ B cell subset that is maintained by viremia and coordinates the HIV Env–specific humoral response.

Authors

James J. Knox, Marcus Buggert, Lela Kardava, Kelly E. Seaton, Michael A. Eller, David H. Canaday, Merlin L. Robb, Mario A. Ostrowski, Steven G. Deeks, Mark K. Slifka, Georgia D. Tomaras, Susan Moir, M. Anthony Moody, Michael R. Betts

×

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Adrenal aldosterone excess is the most common cause of secondary hypertension and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. However, adverse metabolic risk in primary aldosteronism extends beyond hypertension, with increased rates of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis, which cannot be easily explained by aldosterone excess.

METHODS. We performed mass spectrometry–based analysis of a 24-hour urine steroid metabolome in 174 newly diagnosed patients with primary aldosteronism (103 unilateral adenomas, 71 bilateral adrenal hyperplasias) in comparison to 162 healthy controls, 56 patients with endocrine inactive adrenal adenoma, 104 patients with mild subclinical, and 47 with clinically overt adrenal cortisol excess. We also analyzed the expression of cortisol-producing CYP11B1 and aldosterone-producing CYP11B2 enzymes in adenoma tissue from 57 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma, employing immunohistochemistry with digital image analysis.

RESULTS. Primary aldosteronism patients had significantly increased cortisol and total glucocorticoid metabolite excretion (all P < 0.001), only exceeded by glucocorticoid output in patients with clinically overt adrenal Cushing syndrome. Several surrogate parameters of metabolic risk correlated significantly with glucocorticoid but not mineralocorticoid output. Intratumoral CYP11B1 expression was significantly associated with the corresponding in vivo glucocorticoid excretion. Unilateral adrenalectomy resolved both mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid excess. Postoperative evidence of adrenal insufficiency was found in 13 (29%) of 45 consecutively tested patients.

CONCLUSION. Our data indicate that glucocorticoid cosecretion is frequently found in primary aldosteronism and contributes to associated metabolic risk. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist therapy alone may not be sufficient to counteract adverse metabolic risk in medically treated patients with primary aldosteronism.

FUNDING. Medical Research Council UK, Wellcome Trust, European Commission.

Authors

Wiebke Arlt, Katharina Lang, Alice J. Sitch, Anna S. Dietz, Yara Rhayem, Irina Bancos, Annette Feuchtinger, Vasileios Chortis, Lorna C. Gilligan, Philippe Ludwig, Anna Riester, Evelyn Asbach, Beverly A. Hughes, Donna M. O’Neil, Martin Bidlingmaier, Jeremy W. Tomlinson, Zaki K. Hassan-Smith, D. Aled Rees, Christian Adolf, Stefanie Hahner, Marcus Quinkler, Tanja Dekkers, Jaap Deinum, Michael Biehl, Brian G. Keevil, Cedric H.L. Shackleton, Jonathan J. Deeks, Axel K. Walch, Felix Beuschlein, Martin Reincke

×

Advertisement

Open for submissions

JCI Insight is open for new submissions on our submission site.

Click here for more information about the journal and submitting your work.

About JCI Insight

The American Society for Clinical Investigation and Journal of Clinical Investigation are pleased to launch JCI Insight, a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to biomedical research, ranging from preclinical to clinical studies. Headed by Editor in Chief Howard Rockman, JCI Insight provides the research community with a broad forum to publish well-executed, high-quality, and insightful research articles across biomedical specialties.